Jordan Morrissey

Before we announce the winners of the 2016 MyTheatre Awards, we’re proud to present our annual Nominee Interview Series. Nominated for Best Original Work in this year’s London My Theatre Awards, Neil McPherson is the writer behind It Is Easy To Be Dead, a play which follows the life of war poet, Charles Hamilton Sorley, during the […]

  Oliver Simmonds

Rural Illinois in 1979. A flagging old man wastes away on a couch watching sports on his tiny TV and sneaking swigs of whiskey when alone. This is Dodge (Ed Harris), the moribund, impotent pillar of the play. His wife Halie (Amy Madigan) calls out from above. She can’t get over her all-American son Ansel’s […]

  Jordan Morrissey

Recounting the short but significant life of Charles Hamilton Sorley, a Scottish poet of World War One, It is Easy to Be Dead is a sombre take on the brutality of war. Told through a collection of letters and poetry, the play follows Sorley from his time at Cambridge to his studies in Germany before […]

  Jordan Morrissey

With such a small cast and situated within the intimate Trafalgar Studios, Vanities: The Musical relies strongly on its trio of female leads. Lauren Samuels, Ashleigh Gray and Lizzy Connolly certainly deliver deft and formidable performances as the central characters of Mary, Kathy and Joanne—a closely-knit group of friends who begin as peppy cheerleaders, only […]

  Caroline Schurman-Grenier

From the moment the audience walks into Trafalgar Studios, they know it will be a fun evening. A girl in funky clothing is dancing around the room to pop music and another is sitting and frantically looking at her computer. No one is quite sure what to expect, but the mood is set at the […]

  Adam Mcdonnell

Not without both touching and humorous moments and boasting a wonderfully talented pair of actors, This Is Living is a largely flawed piece that relies too heavily on a thin plot line and certainly does enough to entertain but doesn’t leave you with much to reflect on, and is far less groundbreaking or thought-provoking than […]

  Oliver Simmonds

I liken this play to violent videos available on the internet: they are tempting to watch, may be objects of temporary immersion, yet they are ultimately unedifying. They instill little in us other than a general contempt, for their structure and perspective are highly objective and therefore contrast rather soullessly to the personal and spiritual […]

  Caroline Schurman-Grenier

Oscar Wilde’s beloved novel has been adapted into a play and is currently showing at Trafalgar Studios; it is not an event to be missed for all the Wilde enthusiasts of the world. Adapted by Merlin Holland and John O’Connor, it brings together elements from the story which was first published in Lippincott’s Monthly Magazine, […]

  Oliver Simmonds

Morgan Lloyd Malcolm’s latest drama does not need its constant extremes—its actors are accomplished enough that they could make any scenario something exceptional. Myanna Burling and Laura Donnelly deliver realistic performances not only through the play’s dialogue, but also in spite of it. The Wasp is class conflict at its heart: the audience sees wealthy […]

  Oliver Simmonds

Did this play deserve its Olivier Award nomination last year? Absolutely. Its development of character, slow revelation of plot and bitingly black humour make James Fritz’s work a triumph of new writing. The story revolves around two parents, Di and David (Kate Maravan and Jonathan McGuinness), whose son Jack has been beaten up on his […]