Dom Harvey

“The sadness. It gets in your fabric.” The Doll Play: A Miniature Revolution, presented by Witchboy Theatre and Blood Pact Theatre at the recently opened Grand Canyon, sounds disarmingly simple: a bunch of dolls in a child psychologist’s office, fed up of being by jostled and torn by damaged young brats, resolve to reclaim their […]

  Dom Harvey

Theatre fans and writers long for a world where celebrities dropping into a local show doesn’t raise an eyebrow. The Brothers Size drew the attention of a wider audience thanks to Drake’s appearance at Soulpepper on opening night and kept it with a memorable and thoughtful performance. Playwright Tarell Alvin McCraney rose to prominence when […]

  Dom Harvey

“It’s so simple: I need to know you’re listening…” It’s not just a plea to an assailant: it’s a message to audiences at The Assembly Theatre and society at large. The toughest conversations around sexual assault occur behind closed doors, too late to spare one party. By dramatising these so vividly, playwright Amy Lee Lavoie […]

  Dom Harvey

Michael Frayn’s Tony Award-winning play turned BBC film, directed here at Soulpepper by Katrina Darychuk, tackles world-historical events – the development and use of the atomic bomb, the Holocaust, and the Second World War – through the intimate lens of the relationship between brilliant scientists Werner Heisenberg and Niels Bohr: friends, colleagues, rivals, and opponents […]

Awkward silences are your fault. They’re their fault too. A group – or an entire pair – with expired imaginations aching to pretend to be someones with something to say. If you could all shut up for a moment you might enjoy the thought that you’re in a Pinter piece where silence is not an […]

  Dom Harvey

What does it mean for a performer to take on a role? Prince Hamlet, Ravi Jain’s radical reframing of the Shakespeare classic remounted here by Canadian Stage and Why Not Theatre, juggles contradictory answers to that question. Jain describes his mission as “challeng[ing] what stories are being told and who gets to tell them”, which […]

  Dom Harvey

Before we announce the winners of the 2018 MyEntWorld Critics’ Pick Awards, we’re proud to present our annual Nominee Interview Series. It’s hard to stage a production of a timeless classic that keeps what makes it great while still seeming completely original. Outstanding Direction nominee Sarah Thorpe and her team did that with A Christmas Carol, in a […]

  Dom Harvey

Opera is sustainable when you can enjoy it without fully understanding it or taking it seriously. Few works rely on this more than Così fan tutte, which continues to entertain really-rather-refined audiences who would blanch at its antediluvian gender politics in a modern work. The official title translates as “all [women] do it”, and it’s […]

  Dom Harvey

Before we announce the winners of the 2018 MyEntWorld Critics’ Pick Awards, we’re proud to present our annual Nominee Interview Series. Thomas Gough is a staple of Toronto theatre, and a veteran of many shows at Campbell House, who has worked extensively with Outstanding Direction nominee Sarah Thorpe. In Soup Can Theatre/Three Ships Collective’s site-specific reimagining of […]

  Dom Harvey

Oslo’s very existence is remarkable. Staging a full-length work about the most incendiary issue in foreign policy is already a major diplomatic achievement. Turning that into an award-winning Broadway hit? The Nobel Peace Prize is awarded for less. It’s no surprise that playwright JT Rogers embraces that challenge, having already brought a theatrical perspective to […]

  Dom Harvey

Many Shakespeare plays present an imposing barrier to entry even for educated audiences. Directors devise increasingly inventive ways to make them accessible or relevant – or at least to have their own fun and leave their own mark on the work in the guise of doing this. Othello weds a simple plot, touching on familiar […]

  Dom Harvey

Gruesome Playground Injuries is all about variations on themes. Director Chris Bretecher writes that, in following the characters through their unlikely and unlucky journey, “we acknowledge topics of mental health, sexual consent, substance abuse, self harm, and risk taking behaviours”. This is far clearer in the literature than the text: the playbill explains the production’s […]

  Dom Harvey

1979 is a political thriller – but not like that. The (rise and) fall of one of Canada’s most forgotten and forgettable leaders sounds more like a mischievous improv prompt or DVR description for a History show than a recipe for gripping theatre – but it works. It’s easy to see why the production went […]

  Dom Harvey

At Mirvish Productions’ The Play That Goes Wrong, only the title is an understatement. Audiences are quickly enveloped in a fully immersive farce that never lets go- not during the curiously long intermission, and not even leaving the show as fears linger that the ‘fuh-caydes’ of the whole world could collapse at any moment. It’s […]

  Dom Harvey

Christmas cheer is descending on the city, and nowhere more than at Campbell House. The historic museum is the perfect venue for The Three Ships Collective’s adaptation of A Christmas Carol, a rare example of a site that is from the same era as the story and retains its aesthetic. Most authentic Victorian buildings are […]

  Dom Harvey

Scorch, Stacey Gregg’s award-winning play about one teen’s struggle with gender identity and the legal system, is ‘based on a true story’. Beneath that lifeless description Scorch’s real power is in telling the true stories of a larger family of people, who find their right to write their own story under attack, without claiming to […]

  Dom Harvey

Norman Yeung’s Theory is an ambitious meditation on thorny and topical issues, from free speech in academia and society to race and representation in media. Isabelle, a proudly progressive film professor, sets up an anonymous and self-moderated discussion board for her radical new syllabus. Students flood the forum with vicious comments and a campaign of […]