Rachel Ganz

Of Women and Salt by Gabriela Garcia is a family drama that spans five generations and four countries, gracefully weaving fragmented chapters along a seamless spine of female fortitude. Two families are featured in the novel, both of Latin American descent, their intersections meaningful and so-satisfying-I-need-more-immediately. From Camaguey 1866 to Miami in 2019, we explore the […]

  Kelly Bedard

It took me 18 months and three weeks. Nearly 19 months is a long time, a tough pill to swallow for a girl nominally understood to be “one of the smart kids” (though, if we’re being honest with ourselves, that label is far too liberally applied to any decently organized non-athlete unafraid of raising their […]

  Hilary Smith

I loved Jane Austen. And I loved this modern retelling of Pride and Prejudice. It perfectly updates the story to capture all of the same themes and it made me squirm, laugh, and seize up in anticipation the same way I did when I first read P&P as a teenager. In Eligible, Jane is nearly […]

  Hilary Smith

Since Donna Tartt’s debut, in which she was introduced to the world in an 8-page interview in Vanity Fair, she has amassed a cult of devotees. I am such a devotee. I loved The Secret History and especially loved The Little Friend. (It’s a mystery to me why The Little Friend is not as highly […]

  Ann Fitzhenry

The Book Club met to discuss The Lake House by Kate Morton. Our feelings as a group can be summed up by Patty’s comment, “I wanted to stay home from work to keep reading”. Now, you may think that this isn’t saying much, but Patty actually likes her job. It’s high praise. The Lake House […]

  Kelly Bedard

Sean Patrick Flanery wrote a novel. Do you know who Sean Patrick Flanery is? Around the turn of the century, he was tied for first place as my favourite Sean Patrick in Hollywood (the other was Sean Patrick Thomas; remember him?). Flanery was the love interest in a ridiculous 1999 romantic comedy called Simply Irresistible. […]

  Beth McNeil

Two half sisters, an ocean and a world away, give birth to two completely different dynasties. Homegoing follows these families through interwoven tales of love, heartbreak, classism, racism and the struggle of identity, giving us snippets of lives that are at once beautiful in their complexity and unflinchingly real. Effia, known as the beauty, marries […]

  Fabiana Cabral

Greetings, humans. We have genre variety this month to keep your reading palate happy. Two novels, two biographies, a collection of essays about America’s most famous playwright, and a collection of sketches of some of the greatest writers working today: Books In Hand: Hanya Yanagihara’s A Little Life I excitedly impulse-bought Yanagihara’s book after hearing […]

  Fabiana Cabral

Anthony Doerr’s All the Light We Cannot See Book one is this month’s selection for BU’s Core Curriculum alumni book club. We chose the book because we needed a pick that was fast and pleasurable, yet wouldn’t skimp on substance or intelligence. Doerr’s book is the winner of the Pulitzer Prize in Fiction, was a […]

  Theresa Perkins

“The dog did nothing in the night-time. That was the curious incident.” -Sherlock Holmes in Silver Blaze The novel The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-time by Mark Haddon landed on my bookshelf back in 2003. As a junior in high school, Haddon’s fictional story of 15-year-old Christopher was unlike anything that I […]

  Fabiana Cabral

“How angry am I? You don’t want to know. Nobody wants to know about that.” It almost makes you regret knocking. Or was it she who knocked on your door? From the first line, we find ourselves wondering how to deal with the Woman Upstairs. We could keep ignoring her; we’re used to doing so. […]

  Tim Collins

I don’t often read classics, but when I do I’m pleasantly surprised. Daphne Du Maurier’s Rebecca  is the kind of classic novel that immediately appeals to me. It’s well known, but not too well known, and it has a female protagonist. It also has gothic appeal which I’m all for. So with all those things […]

  Brian Balduzzi

Sometimes, you want a little magic in your life.  Erin Morgenstern crafts a National Bestseller with her The Night Circus, chronicling a circus that arrives without warning.  Amidst the wonder of acrobatics, contortionist, tarot card readers, and kittens that jump through hoops, we follow two magicians raised almost since birth to compete in a mysterious […]

  Brian Balduzzi

With a Cape Cod vacation ahead of me, I browsed the bookstore for an equally satisfying beach read.  My eyes caught the title: The American Heiress.  Well, this book had everything that I wanted; it had historical romance, loads of money and class, and a smart writer with the brains and spunk to infuse in […]

  Tim Collins

The Martian is the kind of novel that begs to be made into a movie. So it’s no surprise that the rights have reportedly been purchased. Generally, I tend to be the type who prefers to read a book before seeing the movie/television version (I’m currently reading the tome that is Under the Dome because […]

  Borah Coburn

Julian Barnes’s latest novel, Sense Of An Ending, has been well received. It’s won the 2011 Man Booker prize. It’s well written—which, in this case, actually just means that the prose is restrained, refined, there are occasional changes in rhythm, it’s got a sort of controlled ease, all that soulless jazz. I have liked Julian […]

  Borah Coburn

Tom Holt’s Doughnut is an utter confection* of silliness, sci-fi, world hopping, and awkward family relationships. If you’re unfamiliar with the realm of funny sci-fi, then dearest reader let me introduce you. Funny sci-fi might be just about my favorite thing ever. It deals with all of the fantastical, intriguing sci-fi concepts we can’t stop […]

  Borah Coburn

Glen Duncan’s The Last Werewolf series is a powerful, engrossing, delicious delivery of violence, sex, musings on the why’s of life, questions about the nature of humanity (and monstrosity, as the case may be), and of course, werewolves. What’s not to love? And this is not your average paranormal novel. Naturally, to like the books […]

  Borah Coburn

Gosh. The Basic 8 is one of those books I wish I’d read in high school. I mean, half a decade later it’s still amazing, I just know though, that especially at that age The Basic 8 would have sent me spinning, would have blown my mind, would have been an utter gift. Let’s be […]

  Trevor McNaughton

I was looking over the screenplay of Brokeback Mountain the other day, which was adapted by Larry McMurtry and Diana Ossana from E. Annie Proulx’s shattering short story, and I got to thinking what an overlooked writer McMurtry has been. Oh yes, he’s won the Pulitzer, and made writing about Texas and the modern west […]

  Rachael Nisenkier

I don’t know that I can speak objectively about reading The Raven Boys, or its follow up The Dream Thieves. Since long commutes are a fact of life in southern california, and reading while driving a car tends to end badly, I listened to both on audiobooks. And they enraptured me. I fell deeply into […]

  Trevor McNaughton

Young Man to Middle Aged Man: “You had content but no force.” Middle Aged Man to Young Man: “You had force but no content.” – the original epigraph to Fathers and Sons Ivan Turgenev’s novel of poetic realism is seen today as a recognized masterpiece in its theme of clashing generations. Unlike many masterpieces of […]

  Amanda Sawyer

A few weeks ago when I was browsing through new releases online, one caught my eye, Fangirl by Rainbow Rowell. The book’s description alone made me run to my bookstore the next day and pick it up because I was that college freshman with Harry Potter posters on her dorm room wall (looks around sheepishly). […]

  Trevor McNaughton

This autobiographical novel by Joyce Rebeta-Burditt was a national bestseller when it was first published back in 1976.  Immediately referred to as a female One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest, it became instantly popular but, unlike Ken Kesey’s book, it did not become an enduring classic. This is odd to understand, because re-reading it after […]

  Amanda Sawyer

Ed Kennedy has literally nothing going for him. He is 19, drives a taxi cab, lives in a ramshackle house with his dog the Doorman, and is hopelessly in love with his best friend, Audrey. In other words, he has no plans for his future. His life has been nothing but ordinary and he hasn’t […]

  Brianna Bisson

Like most people my age, I grew up devouring and living for the Harry Potter books. Like most people my age, I learned a lot of important valuable life lessons from the Harry Potter books that I still apply to everyday life (beyond “it’s leviOHsa, not levioSA”). So, to say that JK Rowling occupies a […]